Curriculum

  1. Directed Research

  2. All full-time instructors are authorized to approve academic credit for Directed Research for students who have completed their first year of study. No more than two credit hours may be approved for a student in any semester, with no more than four cumulative credits.

    Directed Research cannot be approved as an alternative means of taking a course that is offered in the Law School, even though scheduling difficulties might prevent a student from taking a course that he or she desires to take.

    Directed Research credit may be approved only for a project in which the research proposal, the grade rule and the credit hours have been agreed upon in advance by the supervising instructor, and where that instructor can give guidance during the development of the project. Written notice of the approved proposal needs to be submitted by the instructor to the Law School Registrar within two weeks of the start of the semester.

    Students taking Directed Research must submit to the supervising instructor written work consisting of a completed draft of a research paper or memorandum of law containing either criticism of the law relating to the topic area or synthesis of legal source materials into a statement of the law in the topic area. A minimum of 50 hours of work is required for each hour of credit awarded.

    No Directed Research credit shall be awarded for research substantially used to earn credit in any Co-Curricular program (Law 792R and Law 793R).

    Instructors are under no obligation to supervise Directed Research projects, but they should not in any event be requested to undertake to supervise more than a total of two students in externships, Directed Research, or a combination of both in any semester.

    A student may register for Directed Research credit only during Fall or Winter semester.

    Credit for Co-Curricular Journals (Law 792R and Law 793R)

    For students entering the law school as first-year students in August 2016 or earlier:

    Law 792R: Credit for participation in a Law Review, Journal of Public Law, or Journal of Law and Education co-curricular program is authorized in the amount of one credit per semester for successful completion of the Basic Work Assignment in the program. The governing body of each Co-Curricular program, subject to the approval of its faculty advisor, shall establish the Basic Work Assignment of the program.

    Law 793R: Up to two hours of additional credit is available for certain additional academic work by students who are members of a co-curricular program under the conditions described below. The governing body of each co-curricular program will recommend to the faculty advisor the names of students to receive credit under this provision.

    1. Credit for Law 793R 1 (Law Review)
    2. Third-year law students who register for Law 793R § 1 may receive two additional hours of credit for successful completion of the Third- Year Co-Curricular Writing Project established by the governing board of the Law Review and approved by its faculty advisor.

      Although the Co-Curricular Program’s faculty advisor is not automatically the supervisor of a student’s writing project, the faculty advisor shall evaluate each enrolled student’s academic achievement for these two additional credits. The faculty adviser shall submit to the registrar the grade for each enrolled student, whether pass, low pass, or fail.

    3. Credit for Law 793R 3 (Journal of Public Law)
    4. Third-year law students who register for Law 793R § 3 may receive two additional hours of credit for successful completion of the Third- Year Co-Curricular Writing Project established by the governing board of the Journal of Public Law and approved by its faculty advisor. The requirements are enumerated below. Although the Co-Curricular Program’s faculty advisor is not automatically the supervisor of a student’s writing project, the faculty advisor shall evaluate each enrolled student’s academic achievement for these two additional credits. The faculty advisor shall submit to the registrar the grade for each enrolled student, whether pass, low pass, or fail.

      1. Papers are approximately thirty pages in length, including footnotes. Text is double-spaced, footnotes single spaced.
      2. By the end of the second week of the semester, the student notifies the lead note and comment editor of the Journal of their intention to write their third-year paper and obtain topic approval.
      3. Drafts of papers are submitted to an assigned editor for comments and suggestions on a scheduled basis throughout the semester.
      4. After making appropriate changes, students resubmit papers for lead note and comment editor approval.
      5. When papers have met required standards, Journal management committee members will certify completion of the requirement. Students must have certification of satisfactory completion prior to the end of the semester in which they have registered for third year co-curricular writing credit.
    5. Credit for Law 793R 4 (Journal of Law and Education)
    6. Third-year law students who register for Law 793R § 4 may receive two additional hours of credit for successful completion of the Third- Year Co-Curricular Writing Project established by the governing board of the Journal of Law and Education and approved by its faculty advisor. Although the Co-Curricular Program’s faculty advisor is not automatically the supervisor of a student’s writing project, the faculty advisor shall evaluate each enrolled student’s academic achievement for these two additional credits. The faculty advisor shall submit to the registrar the grade for each enrolled student, whether pass, low pass, or fail.

      The faculty advisor for each Co-Curricular program shall evaluate each enrolled student’s academic achievement. Evaluation of students’ academic achievement may include, but is not limited to, the faculty advisor’s review of hourly logs or other records to determine that students are completing the Basic Work Assignment and required 50 hours of work per co- curricular credit; consultations with student leaders; observation of student performances of skills; review of student written work; etc. The faculty advisor shall submit to the registrar the grade for each enrolled student.

      Credit for Law 792R and Law 793R, if awarded, will be recorded as a pass or as a low pass. Low pass will appear on the transcript at a grade of 2.7. The grade submitted for non- completion of the Basic Work Assignment will be a 1.6.

      Credit for Law 792R and Law 793R is subject to the law school rule (VIII.B.) that no student can earn more than 21 hours of cumulative credit for courses listed in ABA Standard 311, Interpretation 311-1(b).

      Students otherwise eligible for membership may participate in multiple co-curricular programs, subject to the cumulative credit limits described in Section VIII.B.

      Participation in a co-curricular program is limited to students who have completed their first year of law study and who have a cumulative 2.7 or above grade-point average.

    For students entering the law school as first-year students in August 2017 or later:

    Credit for participation in any Law School-approved journal (as of April 2018, these are Law Review, Journal of Public Law, and Journal of Law and Education) may be earned under the following circumstances:

    Law 792R: Students who are members of an approved journal in their second year of law school may earn up to one (1) credit towards graduation per semester by satisfying the required obligations of a member under the approved journal’s bylaws.

    Law 793R: Students who are members of an approved journal’s editorial board in their third year of law school may earn up to two (2) credits toward graduation each semester. Students who are members of an approved journal in their third year of law school, but who do not hold editorial board positions, may earn up to one (1) credit toward graduation per semester by satisfying the required obligations of a third-year member under the approved journal’s bylaws.

    The faculty advisor for each approved journal shall evaluate each enrolled student’s academic achievement. Evaluation of student’s academic achievement may include, but is not limited to, the faculty advisor’s review of hourly logs or other records to determine that students are satisfying the required obligations of a member under the approved journal’s bylaws; consultations with student leaders; review of student written work, etc. The faculty advisor shall submit to the registrar the grade for each enrolled student.

    Credit, if awarded, will be recorded as a pass or as a low pass. Low pass will appear on the transcript at a grade of 2.7. The grade submitted for non-completion of the required obligations will be a 1.6.

    Credit for Law 792R and Law 793R is subject to the law school rule (VIII.B) that no student can earn more than twenty-one (21) hours of cumulative credit for courses listed in ABA Standard 311, Interpretation 311-1(b)

    Notwithstanding the 21-hour limitation set forth in Section VIII.B, no student may earn more than six (6) total credits in co-curricular programs.

    Students otherwise eligible for membership may participate in multiple co-curricular programs, subject to the cumulative credit limits described in Section VIII.B.

    Participation in a co-curricular program, and enrollment in Law 792R and Law 793R, is limited to students who have completed their first year of law study and who have a cumulative 2.7 or above grade-point average.

  3. Credit for Moot Court & Trial Advocacy Co-Curricular Programs (Law 792R and Law 793R)

  4. For students entering the law school as first-year students in August 2016 or earlier:

    Law 792R: Credit for participation in a Moot Court or Trial Advocacy Co-Curricular program is authorized in the amount of one credit per semester for successful completion of the Basic Work Assignment in the program. The governing body of each Co-Curricular program, subject to the approval of its faculty advisor, shall establish the Basic Work Assignment of the program.

    Law 793R: Up to two hours of additional credit is available for certain additional academic work by students who are members of a co-curricular program under the conditions described below. The governing body of each co-curricular program will recommend to the faculty advisor the names of students to receive credit under this provision.

    1. Credit for Law 793R 2 (Moot Court)
    2. One hour of credit is authorized for second- or third-year students who are members of the Moot Court Co-Curricular program and who, in addition to successfully completing the Basic Work Assignment of the program, participate in one or more Moot Court competitions during the academic year. No more than one extra hour of credit shall be awarded for each academic year regardless of the number of competitions entered, making students eligible for a total of two hours of additional credit during their second and third year. The faculty advisor shall evaluate each enrolled student’s academic achievement for these additional credits. The faculty advisor shall submit to the registrar the grade for each enrolled student, whether pass, low pass, or fail.

    3. Credit for Law 793R 5 (Trial Advocacy)
    4. One hour of credit is authorized for second-year students who, in addition to successfully completing the Basic Work Assignment of the Trial Advocacy program, travel to a trial advocacy competition during the winter semester of their second year. One additional hour of credit is authorized for third-year students who, in addition to successfully completing the Basic Work Assignment of the Trial Advocacy program, travel to a trial advocacy competition during the winter semester of their third year. The faculty advisor shall evaluate each enrolled student’s academic achievement for these additional credits. The faculty advisor shall submit to the registrar the grade for each enrolled student, whether pass, low pass, or fail.

      The faculty advisor for each Co-Curricular program shall evaluate each enrolled student’s academic achievement. Evaluation of students’ academic achievement may include, but is not limited to, the faculty advisor’s review of hourly logs or other records to determine that students are completing the Basic Work Assignment and required 50 hours of work per co- curricular credit; consultations with student leaders; observation of student performances of skills; review of student written work; etc. The faculty advisor shall submit to the registrar the grade for each enrolled student.

      Credit for Law 792R and Law 793R, if awarded, will be recorded as a pass or as a low pass. Low pass will appear on the transcript at a grade of 2.7. The grade submitted for non- completion of the Basic Work Assignment will be a 1.6.

      Credit for Law 792R and Law 793R is subject to the law school rule (VIII.B.) that no student can earn more than 21 hours of cumulative credit for courses listed in ABA Standard 311, Interpretation 311-1(b).

      Students otherwise eligible for membership may participate in multiple co-curricular programs, subject to the cumulative credit limits described in Section VIII.B.

      Participation in a co-curricular program is limited to students who have completed their first year of law study and who have a cumulative 2.7 or above grade-point average.

    For students entering the law school as first-year students in August 2017 or later:

    Credit for participation in Co-Curricular Moot Court and Co-Curricular Trial Advocacy may be earned under the following circumstances:

    Law 792R: Students who are members of either Co-Curricular Moot Court or Co- Curricular Trial Advocacy are eligible in their second and third years of law school to earn up to one (1) credit toward graduation per semester.

    Law 793R: Students who are members of inter-scholastic competition teams for either Moot Court or Trial Advocacy in their second or third years are eligible to earn up to one additional credit per competition up to a maximum of two (2) competitions during law school. This one (1) additional credit per competition up to a maximum of two credits is in addition to any credits they earn under Section II.C.1, above.

    The faculty advisor for Moot Court and Trial Advocacy shall evaluate each enrolled student’s academic achievement. Evaluation of student’s academic achievement may include, but is not limited to, the faculty advisor’s review of hourly logs or other records to determine that students are satisfying the required obligations of a member under the approved co-curricular’s bylaws; consultations with student leaders; review of student written work, etc. The faculty advisor shall submit to the registrar the grade for each enrolled student. Credit, if awarded, will be recorded as a pass or as a low pass. Low pass will appear on the transcript at a grade of 2.7. The grade submitted for non-completion of the required obligations will be a 1.6.

    Credit for Law 792R and Law 793R is subject to the law school rule (VIII.B) that no student can earn more than twenty-one (21) hours of cumulative credit for courses listed in ABA Standard 311, Interpretation 311-1(b)

    Notwithstanding the 21-hour limitation set forth in Section VIII.B, no student may earn more than six (6) total credits in a Co-Curricular program (Law 792R and Law 793R).

    Participation in a co-curricular program, and enrollment in Law 792R and Law 793R, is limited to students who have completed their first year of law study and who have a cumulative 2.7 or above grade-point average.

    1. Notwithstanding the above limitation on first-year participation in co-curricular programs, first-year students may participate as competitors in a 1L mini- competition in the Winter semester of their first year of law school, provided the competition meets the following requirements. Scheduling of each first-year competition must be approved by the law school administration.
    2. Moot Court: First-year students may compete in a first-year moot court competition if (i) the competition is restricted to arguing the appellate brief already written by all students in their Introduction to Advocacy course (Law 546) that semester; and (ii) the competition shall not exceed eight consecutive days (not counting any Sunday) for any student, measured from the first day of participating in an oral argument round.
    3. Trial Advocacy: First-year students may compete in a first-year trial advocacy competition if (i) the competition does not exceed three consecutive days (not containing any Sunday); (ii) participation is wholly voluntary and no academic credit is granted; and (iii) the competition problem is not released to participants until 6:00 a.m. the first day of the competition.

  5. Duplication of Credit

  6. A student may not submit for credit in a course or seminar substantially the same paper or other work product that he or she has prepared for:

    • another course,
    • another seminar,
    • an employer,
    • any other non-university activity,

    unless the following requirements are all met

    1. The paper as submitted shall not have been edited by the employer or other law-trained person (including law students);
    2. There has been full disclosure and advance consent by all persons involved in any instructional or supervisory capacity in the course or seminar;
    3. The research and writing must have been substantially performed during or immediately prior to the semester or term for which the course credit is awarded;
    4. No credit in a course or seminar shall be awarded for work substantially used to earn credit in a co-curricular program; and
    5. The student must not have received compensation for the paper or other work product.
  7. Seminars

  8. The maximum size will be decided by the instructor. Any enrollment priorities specified by the teacher of the class will be determinative. To the extent that teacher determination does not control, the following enrollment priorities will be followed in the order listed:

    1. Those who have taken the fewest seminars will be given preference over those who have more.
    2. Students who have not had a trial practice type seminar will be preferred over those who have taken such a seminar or course.
    3. Students with less time remaining prior to graduation will be preferred over those with more remaining.
    4. Within categories, selection will be by lot.

    Use of reports, papers, examinations or other methods of teaching and evaluation, as well as attendance requirements, are matters in the discretion of the instructor. The Curriculum Committee must approve departures from numerical grading.

  9. Professional Responsibility

  10. The ABA requirement of teaching professional responsibility will be met as follows:

    1. Instructors of first-year courses will cover in their courses professional responsibility issues where applicable.
    2. Instructors of second- and third-year courses will cover in their courses professional responsibility issues where applicable.
    3. Students must take a two-credit Professional Responsibility course during their second or third year of Law School.
  11. Substantial Writing Requirement

  12. Each student must individually prepare, during his or her second or third year, a substantial paper. Students may not fulfill the substantial writing requirement during the first year of law school.

    The standards and procedures are:

    1. The paper must be original work consisting of criticism, analysis, synthesis or history of law or a law-related topic. The paper must not be a paraphrase or summary of the work of others. It must advance and defend one or more central theses.
    2. The paper must be of satisfactory quality, meaning that it must have been revised in accordance with paragraphs II.G. 8 and 9, and that it must qualify for a grade of 3.0 or higher, or a pass grade in a pass/fail offering. The paper must be at least 30 letter-size pages long, including footnotes. Text shall be double-spaced, and footnotes shall be single-spaced.
    3. The paper must be written for credit in connection with a Law School course or seminar, a co-curricular law journal, or directed research. Courses that offer the substantial writing option are so designated in the Law School course materials. Briefs and trial advocacy documents, whether prepared for a course, seminar, co-curricular program or other activity, do not satisfy the substantial writing requirement.
    4. A paper written for a co-curricular law journal may satisfy the substantial writing requirement if the paper is written for credit (including co-curricular credit), is submitted to the supervising faculty member without co-curricular editorial advice or revisions, and meets the other standards and procedures described in this section (II. G.). The faculty advisor of the co-curricular program is not automatically the supervising faculty member for the paper; students shall find their own supervising faculty member.
    5. The paper must be supervised by a Law School full-time faculty member, except that supervision by a law library faculty member, a part-time faculty member, or an adjunct faculty member may be authorized by the Associate Dean—Faculty and Curriculum in circumstances that he or she finds appropriate, such as expertise on the part of the authorized supervisor that is not available in the full- time faculty.
    6. The student must obtain the supervising faculty member’s written agreement to supervise the paper, preferably by the end of the second week of the semester.
    7. The supervising faculty member shall be available to meet individually with the student to provide supervision, guidance, and individualized assessment regarding the paper.
    8. The student shall submit at least one draft of the paper to the supervising faculty member for comments and suggestions, and that faculty member shall make comments and suggestions as appropriate.
    9. After making appropriate changes, the student shall resubmit the paper to the supervising faculty member for approval or directions for further revision. When the supervising faculty member finds that the paper meets the applicable standards, he or she will certify completion of the substantial writing requirement by signing a blue card obtained by the student from the Law School Registrar.
    10. The student must submit certification of completion for the substantial writing requirement to the Law School Registrar before graduation.
  13. Professional Skills Requirement

  14. Each student must fulfill the Professional Skills Requirement by completing:

    1. At least two hours of externship credit; or
    2. At least one of the second-year or third-year courses designated as a “Professional Skills Course” in the Law School course materials.

    The Associate Dean for Faculty and Curriculum will designate in the course materials the courses that qualify as Professional Skills Courses in accordance with ABA standards.

    Each student must fulfill the Professional Skills Requirement by completing at least six hours of:

    1. Externship credit; and/or
    2. Courses designated as “Professional Skills Courses” in the Law School course materials.

    The Associate Dean for Faculty and Curriculum will designate in the course materials the courses that qualify as Professional Skills Courses in accordance with ABA standards.

  15. Clinics, Clinical Alliances, & Externships

  16. The following policies govern law school clinic, clinical alliance and externship registration, participation, grading and credit-hour limitations

    1. Law School Clinic (788R)
      1. A law school clinic provides a substantial lawyering experience that: (i) involves advising or representing one or more actual clients or serving as a third-party neutral; and (ii) includes the following: (a) direct supervision of the student’s performance by a faculty member; (b) opportunities for performance, feedback from a faculty member, and self-evaluation; and (c) a classroom instructional component. The determination of whether a course meets these requirements will be made by the Law School Associate Dean for Curriculum and Faculty.
      2. Law School Clinics are graded on a pass/fail basis.
      3. Law school clinics are not subject to the 21-hour cumulative credit hour limitation contained in Section VIII.B.
    2. Clinical Alliance (780R) and Externship (599R)
      1. Clinical Alliance: A clinical alliance course combines a regularly scheduled 1-credit seminar with a clinical alliance field placement. The classroom component allows for faculty instruction specifically tailored to the subject matter of the clinical alliance field placement as well as ongoing, contemporaneous, faculty-guided reflection for the clinical alliance field placement experience.
      2. Externship: An externship is a summer, fall or winter field placement. Any student who wishes to participate in an externship during fall or winter semester must first complete a clinical alliance course in the same subject matter area as the desired externship field placement. First-year summer externships are not subject to this clinical alliance course requirement.
      3. Clinical Alliance or Externship Field Placement: The clinical alliance or externship field placement provides a substantial lawyering experience that is reasonably similar to the experience of a lawyer advising or representing a client or engaging in other lawyering tasks in a setting outside a law clinic under the supervision of a licensed attorney or an individual otherwise qualified to supervise, and includes the following: (i) direct supervision of the student’s performance by a faculty member or site supervisor; (ii) opportunities for performance, feedback from either a faculty member or a site supervisor, and self-evaluation; (iii) a written understanding among the student, faculty member, and a person in authority at the field placement that describes both: the substantial lawyering experience and opportunities for performance, feedback and self-evaluation; and (b) the respective roles of faculty and any site supervisor in supervising the student and in assuring the educational quality of the experience for the student, including a clearly articulated method of evaluating the student’s academic performance; and (iv) evaluation of each student’s educational achievement by a faculty member.
      4. Clinical Alliance or Field Placement Registration Process: In general, placements will be approved on a first-come, first-served basis. Clinical alliance or externship field placements may be competitive, pre-arranged or student-arranged.
        1. Competitive Clinical Alliance or Externship Field Placements: If a clinical alliance or externship field placement is competitive, the Office of Career Services & Professional Development (“CSPD”) will advertise the field placement opportunity to all eligible students who must complete an application process through the CSPD. A student who enters the competitive clinical alliance placement process must commit to register for the corresponding clinical alliance course or externship if selected. A student who is selected by a competitive field placement provider and who fails to accept the placement and to register for the associated clinical alliance course or externship will not be permitted to participate in any future competitive clinical alliance or externship field placements. Students may only accept one competitive clinical alliance or externship field placement per semester.
        2. Prearranged or Student-Arranged Clinical Alliance or Externship Field Placements: If the clinical alliance or externship field placement is pre-arranged or student-arranged, the student must complete the petition process for working in an approved clinical alliance or externship field placement through the CSPD. Details on applying for clinical alliance or externship field placement are available from the CSPD which will assist students in securing placements with pre-arranged or student-arranged placement providers. Placements with providers who do not have a past or ongoing relationship with the law school will be evaluated to ensure that the student will be properly supervised, provided adequate space and support for work, and given a high quality experiential learning opportunity and must be approved by the CSPD. Any student who wishes to participate in a pre-arranged or student-arranged clinical alliance field placement during fall or winter semester must enroll in the clinical alliance course which corresponds to the field placement selected by the student. Any questions about selecting the appropriate clinical alliance course should be directed to the CSPD.
      5. Clinical Alliance or Externship Field Placement Work-Hour Requirement: Students are required to perform 42.5 hours of work in the clinical alliance or externship field placement for each credit hour earned.
      6. Clinical Alliance and Externship Field Placements Credit Hours:
        1. Generally, students may earn up to 4.0 credits in a fall or winter semester clinical alliance or externship field placement. Students participating in the Washington Seminar or other curriculum committee approved program may earn up to 9.0 credit hours.
        2. Generally, students may earn up to 4.0 credits in a summer externship field placement, however, up to 6.0 credit hours may be earned under the following circumstances:
          1. A student pursues both an international and a domestic field placement in the same summer;
          2. A student pursues a government or public interest field placement where the placement provider requires the student to spend more than 170 hours in the field placement;
          3. A student pursues two high-quality government or public interest placements which cumulatively require the student to spend more than 170 hours in the respective field placements;
          4. A student pursues a private sector placement for up to 4-credit hours and a government or public interest placement which cumulatively require the student to spend more than 170 hours in the respective field placements.
        3. Only the Director of Externships may grant exceptions to these credit hour limitations and such exceptions will only be granted in exceptional circumstances.
      7. Clinical alliance courses and externships are graded on a pass/fail basis
      8. Credit earned by completing Clinical Alliance (Law 780R) and Externship (Law 599R) courses are subject to the following limitations:
      9. All clinical alliances and externships are subject to the 21-hour cumulative credit hour limitation contained in Section VIII.B.

        1. No more than six (6) externship credits earned during the Spring or Summer semesters may count toward graduation;
        2. No more than three (3) externship credits earned at a law firm placement may count toward graduation;
        3. No more than four (4) externship credits may be earned in a single Externship (Law 599R) or Clinical Alliance (Law 780R) course or experience during a Fall or Winter Semester; provided, however, that students participating in the Washington Semester may earn up to nine
          (9) externship credits at their Washington Semester externship placement.
        4. In addition to the above limitations, no more than twelve (12) credits from Externship (Law 599R) and Clinical Alliance (Law 780R) may count toward graduation; provided, however, that any student entering BYU law school in August 2017 or August 2018 and participating in a full-time externship outside the state of Utah in a program approved by the law school credits would cause the student to exceed the 12-credit limitation may count up to three (3) additional credits from that externship toward graduation.
        5. All Clinical Alliance (Law 780R) and Externship (Law 599R) credits are subject to the 21-hour cumulative credit hour limitation contained in Section VIII.B.
      10. Students may not receive both compensation and credit for any field placement work. Stipends for travel expenses, living expenses and other costs associated with the field placement work are permitted.
      11. Generally, only students who complete the first year curriculum may enroll in an externship or clinical alliance. Students who seek an exception to this rule must submit a written petition to the Externship Director identifying the proposed field placement and the first year courses not yet completed. An exception will only be granted where the Externship Director, the Dean of Students and the appropriate field placement faculty supervisor agree to the exception.
  17. Non-law Courses

  18. Students may receive law school credit for approved non-law school courses in the three categories described below. Approval is given by the Associate Dean for Research and Academic Affairs. While a student may obtain law school credit under each of these categories, no student may receive more than a total of 15 law school credits for non-law courses. Furthermore, no student may receive more than a total of 6 law school credits for non-law courses outside the category of a Joint Degree Program. In order to receive credit for a non-law school course, a student must receive a grade of “C” or better in the course. The grade for the non-law school course will be reflected on the student’s university transcript but will not be considered in determining the student’s law school class rank.

    As further described in Section VIII.B, infra, any credit earned in approved non-law school courses will count toward the maximum 21 hours of cumulative credit for courses listed in ABA Standard 311, Interpretation 311-1(b).

    1. Joint Degree Programs
    2. The Law School has entered into formal arrangements under which students can receive the indicated amount of law school credit by completing their degree in the following joint degree programs: JD/MBA (12 credits), JD/ MPA (11.5 credits), JD/MPP (9 credits), JD/MAcc (12 credits), and JD/MEd (6 credits).

      For further information about the requirements of these joint-degree programs, consult with the Associate Dean for Research and Academic Affairs.

    3. Foreign Language Courses
    4. Students may receive credit for foreign language courses taken after the first year of law school as follows:

      For approved 300-level (or above) university courses in grammar or composition, a student may receive one law school credit for every two university credits earned; for approved 400-level (or above) courses involving translation of legal materials, a student may receive one law school credit for every university credit earned. To receive credit for these courses students must obtain prior approval from the Associate Dean for Research and Academic Affairs. An official BYU transcript must be submitted to the Law School Registrar showing foreign language courses before or at the time of the graduation interview.

      The Law School has also arranged with the Marriott School of Management for law students to receive two law school credits for completing any of the following three-credit, Business Management (596R) courses: Business Arabic; Business Chinese; Business French; Business German; Business Italian; Business Japanese; Business Korean; Business Russian; Business Spanish; or Business Portuguese. Students may register for these courses without obtaining formal permission from the Associate Dean for Research and Academic Affairs. Students will, however, need to notify the Law School Registrar of their enrollment so that they receive two law credits for each course.

    5. Other Non-law Courses
    6. Students may obtain law school credit for other non-law school courses under the following conditions:

      1. The courses must be graduate courses or upper division undergraduate courses and must be in subject areas substantially related to law;
      2. The students must request and obtain the approval of the Associate Dean for Research and Academic Affairs, including with each request detailed course information and an endorsement from a member of the law faculty; and
      3. Law school credit approved for such courses will be at a rate of one law school credit for each graduate course credit and one law school credit for each two upper division undergraduate course credits. [Non-law school credits earned prior to Fall Semester 2009 are subject to the previous rule which provided “Law school credit approved for such courses will be at the rate of one law school credit for each two course credits.”]

  19. Required Courses

  20. See Law School rule VIII.A, infra.

  21. Non-law Students in Law Courses

    1. A non-law graduate student at BYU may enroll in a law school class if:
      1. The student’s department chair certifies to the law school Registrar that the student is academically capable of doing the work and that the law class is an important element in the student’s overall education plan;
      2. There is room in the class; and
      3. The professor agrees, in advance, that the student may enroll.
    2. If a class taught at the law school is cross-listed with another department or college at the University, non-law students may enroll in the class under the course number listed by the other department or college, if they are eligible to do so under the rules of the other department or college.
    3. Non-law students enrolled in a law school class under a law school course number will be graded according to the law school’s grading standards, procedures, and deadlines.
    4. Students enrolled in a cross-listed class under a course number listed by another department or college will be graded according to the University’s grading standards, procedures, and deadlines.